Activist refuses to step aside

Local | Michael Shum 16 Jul 2020

Activist Frankie Fung Tat-chun will run in the upcoming Legislative Council elections despite losing in the pan-democratic camp's primary elections.

Fung, who initially ranked fourth in Kowloon West, was edged out by Kalvin Ho Kai-ming after all paper ballots were counted by organizers yesterday.

That meant Ho clinched the last spot to qualify to run in the September 6 elections, but Fung said yesterday that he will also run as the margin was only 120 votes between the two.

Fung said he will still join the September elections but will encourage his supporters to vote for candidates that rank above them if he still ranks fifth in public opinion polls before the vote.

"You can see that the margin between me and Ho was very, very small. Therefore, I will still run in the upcoming Legco elections, and fight till the very end of the battle," Fung said.

"However, if I continue to rank fifth in the public opinion poll before the September elections, I will call upon my supporters to vote for the four candidates who ranked above me in the primaries," he said.

Fung will run alongside Ho, Civil Human Rights Front convener Jimmy Sham Tsz-kit, student activist Sunny Cheung Kwan-yang and Civic Party's Claudia Mo Man-ching.

Democratic Party's Helena Wong Pik-wan and district councillor Lawrence Lau Wai-chung both declared that they will not run after losing in the primaries.

Meanwhile, Civic Party chairman Alan Leong Kah-kit expressed gratitude to those who voted for his party members in the primary election.

"Citizens are under great pressure exerted by the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office and the liaison office that they may have breached the national security law by casting a vote for the primary election," he said.

"Such a spirit of staying true to oneself, being fearless of totalitarianism and using votes to battle against the extreme power - the Civic Party greatly respects that."



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