Magic fizzles out from moon spectacle by sea

A giant inflatable moon that sat on a tugboat at the Kwun Tong waterfront had to be salvaged yesterday after being blown into the sea by intense gusts. The glowing 15-meter-high ball was one of the biggest photo-taking attractions at the four-day "Fly Me To The Moon" festivities for the...

Michael Shum

Friday, September 24, 2021

A giant inflatable moon that sat on a tugboat at the Kwun Tong waterfront had to be salvaged yesterday after being blown into the sea by intense gusts.

The glowing 15-meter-high ball was one of the biggest photo-taking attractions at the four-day "Fly Me To The Moon" festivities for the Mid-Autumn Festival hosted by business group GP42.

The festival also featured a Canto-pop concert and hawkers offered traditional food on the waterfront.

But the ball, tethered to a tugboat parked near the Kwun Tong Promenade, fell into the water and deflated.

It eventually sank and had to be salvaged.

Workers sent by the organizers fished it out around noon, with officers from the Marine Department monitoring the whole operation.

GP42 said it was scheduled to retract the "moon" yesterday, but it accidentally fell into the water after cables tying it to the tugboat collapsed due to the weather. And so it initiated a contingency plan.

The observatory issued a special weather warning yesterday morning, reminding people to beware of intense gusts reaching 90 kilometers per hour or stronger amid thunderstorms.

Web users had a little fun over the incident, saying the deflated "moon" in the water looked like meatballs in a hotpot.

Another added: "The 'moon' knows Kwun Tong's traffic is usually bad, so it opted to leave by sea!"

In 2013, a huge 16m inflatable rubber duck outside Harbour City was found on its side almost two weeks after its arrival in Hong Kong. The exhibition organizer said it was part of a scheduled maintenance work.

In the same year, an inflatable exhibit at the West Kowloon Cultural District called "Complex Pile" looked like "excretion that exploded under the rain."

michael.shum@singtaonewscorp.com