Pupils in race back to school

Mandy Zheng Face-to-face classes resumed in all schools yesterday, with students saying they were so excited they forgot to bring their homework. Primary two to four, secondary two to four, as well as K1, K2 and pre-nursery pupils returned to school yesterday, with the rest already back since last...

Mandy Zheng

Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Mandy Zheng

Face-to-face classes resumed in all schools yesterday, with students saying they were so excited they forgot to bring their homework.

Primary two to four, secondary two to four, as well as K1, K2 and pre-nursery pupils returned to school yesterday, with the rest already back since last Wednesday.

At Hong Kong Ling Liang Church Sau Tak Kindergarten, parents and kids took selfies at the entrance while teachers welcomed them with bubble guns.

Tse, the mother of two kindergarteners, said: "We are so excited that we forgot to bring the homework for handicraft lessons!"

Another parent, Lee, said her younger son had been jealous of his K3 brother, who often shared school-day anecdotes after returning to school earlier than him last Wednesday.

"[My younger son] woke up at 6.30am, dressed up and finished eating by himself just to wait for me to get up," she said.

In Kwai Chung, a student of the Salesians of Don Bosco Ng Siu Mui Secondary School said he was eager to catch up with studies.

"When there's cooking noises at home, I can't hear teachers talking [in online classes]," he said.

But Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung Yun-hung warned on Facebook that class suspensions are still possible.

"We should be prepared mentally that certain schools, even all schools citywide, could still have to [go back to] online classes," he said.

That all came as a survey found children spent much more time on tablets and phones during class suspension between February and May, increasing the risk of short-sightedness.

The poll was conducted by six eye-care groups, including the Eye Fund and Polytechnic University's school of optometry, taking in 400 parents and kids aged six to 17.

The children spent an average of nearly 10 hours on electronic tools a day - 1.1 times more than before. Participants also saw short-sightedness levels increase by an average of minus 0.87 diopters, 16 percent higher than the usual minus 0.75 diopters.