Hong Kong athletes made history, says Carrie Lam

Local | 18 Oct 2021 5:16 pm

Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor said the city’s athletes have continued to make history by obtaining remarkable achievements at international sports events.

Speaking at today's return ceremony for the city’s delegation from the Tokyo Paralympics, Lam said their strong will and hard work in the competitions fully demonstrated their admirable sportsmanship and perseverance.

Hong Kong athletes have clinched a total of five medals at the Tokyo Paralympic Games, comprising of two silver medals in boccia and badminton, and three bronze medals in table-tennis, boccia and badminton.

The Chief Executive said the commendable performances of the Hong Kong athletes not only demonstrated their exceptional talent, their achievements also inspired other people with disabilities in the territory.

“Their spirit of never giving up also brings positive energy to the society,” said Lam.

She said the government will continue to allocate more resources to promote the city’s sports industry, benefitting athletes with disabilities and other athletes. 

She also hopes that these measures would nurture more elite athletes in Hong Kong to bring glory home in international competitions.

Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s para-badminton player Daniel Chan Ho-yuen said he hopes to venture into coaching after retiring from the sport, and to look for the city’s promising young athletes.

Chan had earlier announced his decision to retire from the sport after the Paris 2024 Paralympic Games.

He said he had once doubted his decision on competing in the next Paralympic Games, but the love and support from Hong Kong citizens and his friends had played a huge part in encouraging him to hang on for the next Games.

As for wheelchair fencer Alison Yu Chui-yee, she said competing in the Paris Games is still one of her targets. She also called on the government for more support in helping part-time athletes to make their transition into becoming full-time athletes.



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