Advertisers copy slogans of protesters

About 1,500 members of the advertising industry gathered in Central yesterday to mark the start of a five-day strike, according to the organizer. The assembly, organized by Advertising Civilians, was held in Chater Garden. Participants said during the five days they "will not create,...

Angel Kwan

Tuesday, December 03, 2019

About 1,500 members of the advertising industry gathered in Central yesterday to mark the start of a five-day strike, according to the organizer.

The assembly, organized by Advertising Civilians, was held in Chater Garden.

Participants said during the five days they "will not create, produce, make conference calls, attend meetings, or reply to e-mails."

The group said it has received 960 questionnaires from members of the industry, 96 percent of them supporting the strike and over 89 percent promising to participate.

Spokesman Antony Yiu Koon-tung said it is important for an industry to take the first step and strike, pressuring the government to respond to the five demands of the people.

Participants held posters that read "Three strikes - work, class and business - the advertising industry stands with you" and "five demands, not one less."

One attendee, Leung, came to the rally with her boss, Chan.

"We want to tell the government that we will not give up on the five demands even if we had a small victory in [district council] election - even though it seems to be relatively quiet these days," Leung said.

She said she thinks the Independent Review Committee that Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor proposed will not be effective as it will not investigate the police's use of force.

"Students have done a lot for us and it's time for us, the adults, to do something for this movement," Leung said. Chan is one of the owners of a small advertising agency. She said their company has decided to respond to the call and strike for a day.

She said the strike may not play a decisive role in pressuring the government but can help encourage other industries to strike.

"Those in the aviation industry, medical industry if they go on strike it would have more of an impact on society than ours. But we are starting it," Chan said.

Yiu said the group will also organize a series of activities for the industry to help "yellow" stores - shops which support protesters - in promotion.

The group will collect briefs from the stores and fellows in the advertising industry can voluntarily work on them.

angel.kwan@singtaonewscorp.com