Calls to stub out tobacco deals

Local | Mary Ann Benitez and Chuck Pang 21 Mar 2017

Several legislators yesterday called on the government not to extend further concessions to the tobacco trade that is trying to further delay implementation of bigger graphic health warnings on cigarettes to the detriment of public health.

The government proposed in May 2015 to enlarge the size of health warnings to cover at least 85 percent of the packet or retail containers of cigarettes, saying the existing six graphic health warnings which cover half of packets or containers have been in use since 2007.

The Food and Health Bureau has made four concessions to meet the industry's concerns, including using any background color to show nicotine and tar content and for the English version of the health warning to remain at 50 percent of the surface area of the lid of a drum-shaped container.

Undersecretary for Food and Health Sophia Chan Siu-chee told a Legislative Council health services panel yesterday that the government will also extend the adaptation period from six months to 12 months upon gazetting of the amendment order of the smoking ordinance.

Tourism-sector lawmaker Yiu Si- wing said: "The government is conceding, giving in to the tobacco sector's pressure."

The Labour Party's Fernando Cheung Chiu-hung: "Public health should come first. Especially as I have had some personal health problems, I understand the value of health.

"I understand from the grassroots that smoking is a relief for them from stress but the government should not concede anymore. It has already conceded enough."

Peter Shiu Ka-fai, of the wholesale and retail sector, questioned whether the government would have evidence to show that bigger warnings would mean "people will stop smoking?"

Wong Ting-kwong, of the import and export sector, said he is a smoker and that bigger warnings will still affect second- and third-hand smokers as "the smoke isn't less."

The panel also discussed the Hong Kong Code, a voluntary code aimed at protecting breastfeeding and to impose restrictions on formula milk marketing practices that give misconceptions about the nutritional value of products for children up to 36 months old.

Chan told the legislators: "We consulted the Department of Justice and the code is not breaching the competition law as this is voluntary."

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