Sunday, December 21, 2014   

Penguin gives into India’s attacks against book on Hindus, but author points to online version
(02-12 17:16)

American scholar Wendy Doniger said she was “angry and disappointed'' that all copies of her latest book on Hinduism will be pulped in India after a legal dispute that ignited fears about free speech.
Her publisher Penguin agreed on Monday to withdraw the 2009 book “The Hindus: An Alternative History'' to settle a court battle with an activist group which took offense to the depiction of the religion.
“I was of course angry and disappointed to see this happen and I am deeply troubled by what it foretells for free speech in India in the present, and steadily worsening, political climate,'' she wrote in an email statement to AFP Tuesday.
Doniger, 74, wrote that as a “publisher's daughter, I particularly wince at the knowledge that the existing books [unless they are bought out quickly by people intrigued by all the brouhaha] will be pulped.''
The Shiksha Bachao Andolan Committee, a group of Hindu academics, filed civil and criminal suits in a New Delhi court claiming the book contained factual errors and parts of it misrepresented Hindu mythology.
Other writers and champions of free speech have widely criticized Penguin's decision to cave into pressure and reach a settlement, rather than fight the case and seek to challenge any lower court ruling on appeal.
“The agreement by the publisher to withdraw it is like putting a contract out on free expression,'' wrote commentator Pratap Bhanu Mehta in an opinion piece in The Indian Express newspaper.
Penguin India has not responded to repeated requests for comment, but Doninger sprang to the defense of the publisher, which is part of the publishing giant Penguin Random House.
“Penguin India took this book on knowing that it would stir anger in the Hindutva ranks, and they defended it in the courts for four years, both as a civil and as a criminal suit,'' she wrote.
The mutual agreement between the publisher and the activist group does not impose any legal binding on any other Indian publisher that wishes to publish Doniger's book in India, lawyers say.
Doniger said in her statement she was glad that in the age of the internet, books could not be suppressed – even ones that might offend Hindus.
“‘The Hindus’ is available on Kindle; and if legal means of publication fail, the internet has other ways of keeping books in circulation,'' she wrote.
   
Other World breaking news:
Malaysia charges Australian mum with drug trafficking (12-19 13:10)
Up to 11 dead in Japan snow storms: reports (12-19 12:47)
Japanese scientist resigns over stem cell scandal (12-19 12:36)
SKorea far-left party dissolved for 'backing NKorea' (12-19 11:20)
11th Sierra Leonean doctor dies from Ebola (12-18 18:30)
SKorean group cancels plans for border tree (12-18 17:57)
Merkel says Russia sanctions remain 'unavoidable' (12-18 17:55)
Airbags could have expiry date: Japan auto industry chief (12-18 17:49)
Russian economy to rebound in two years at latest: Putin (12-18 17:37)
Japan lab cannot repeat ground-breaking cell finding (12-18 15:04)

More breaking news >>

© 2014 The Standard, The Standard Newspapers Publishing Ltd.
Contact Us | About Us | Newsfeeds | Subscriptions | Print Ad. | Online Ad. | Street Pts

 


Home | Top News | Local | Business | China | ViewPoint | CityTalk | World | Sports | People | Central Station | Spree | Features

The Standard

Trademark and Copyright Notice: Copyright 2014, The Standard Newspaper Publishing Ltd., and its related entities. All rights reserved.  Use in whole or part of this site's content is prohibited.   Use of this Web site assumes acceptance of the
Terms of Use, Privacy Policy Statement and Copyright Policy.  Please also read our Ethics Statement.