Public transport grinds to a crawl

Local | 15 Nov 2019 10:49 am

Transport across Hong Kong remained disrupted for the fifth straight weekday. Traffic at a busy cross harbour tunnel was halted, while train, bus and tram services continue to be delayed or crippled, RTHK reports.

Across Hong Kong, some major roads remained barricaded by anti-government protesters, especially those near universities.

As several toll booths were set alight at the Cross Harbour Tunnel near the Polytechnic University, traffic on the other two tunnels –Eastern and Western crossings – remained congested.

Students at the Chinese University had announced at 3:00am that they would reopen one lane each way of Tolo Highway from 6:00am. But very little traffic was seen on that road as police had warned motorists that the situation remained dangerous.

In a message posted on their Facebook, police said they are trying to clear the road blocked by "rioters" but their work was was being threatened by people shooting arrows and throwing things at clearing workers.

The East Rail line has been shut down after petrol bombs were thrown at Kowloon Tong station. And there have been scuffles between commuters and protesters in Tin Shui Wai at the West Rail Line after protesters tried to stop a train from departing.

Several MTR stations are closed, including Tin Shui Wai, Tung Chung, Sai Wan Ho, Tseung Kwan O and Mong Kok.

In a statement, the Transport Department said buses will provide only limited services due to safety concerns. It also said tram services will only be provided between Kennedy Town and Sai Wan Ho.

The major roads affected were Pok Fu Lam Road between Pokfield Road and Bonham Road, Chatham Road South near the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (both bounds), Argyle Street near Sai Yee Street, Nathan Road between Dundas Street and Mong Kok Road (both bounds) and Cornwall Street between Waterloo Road and Tat Chee Avenue.

The government note also said about 210 sets of damaged traffic lights are being repaired in various districts.

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