Police aggression haunts Sai Wan Ho, Tai Koo residents

Local | 12 Aug 2019 2:03 pm

MTR stations on the Island Line where violent clashes took place overnight had returned to normal by the morning today, RTHK reports.
But some commuters said they started their trips early as they anticipated more protests. An office worker who have her name as Chu said she took the trouble of arriving an hour earlier than usual.
But Chu said she was still supportive of the protesters. "The main thing is the government needs to listen what the population wants," she said. 
But the fear of last night's clashes were still menacing some residents.

At another spot where clashes erupted– Sai Wan Ho MTR station – one young resident said images of the events haven’t faded away from their minds yet. 
Lam, who is in her 20s, said she is now scared of police after seeing the force used against protesters and appeared nervous and shaking even as she recalled the experience.
"I just live around [here] and there was so many policemen marching from Taikoo to Sai Wan Ho and to Shau Kei Wan. It is not about the protesters that we are afraid of. It is all the police that appear in our neighborhood that makes us scared," she said.
At Tai Koo station, where police clashed with protesters on an elevator, causing many injuries, commuters went to work today just like on a normal day. 
But outside the station, a student, who gave his name as Pun, stood holding a computer on which footage of police hitting protesters was being shown. Some on-lookers stopped to watch the video and expressed support for protesters. 
He also displayed a warning saying that chemicals used in tear gas when mixed with water can turn deadly and advised vulnerable groups like children and pregnant women to stay away from stations where tear gas residue stays until MTR issues a clearance. 
Pun said though Taikoo residents are supportive of anti-government protesters, many may not have known exactly what happened last night and that is why he was there to show them the footage.-Photo: RTHK

 

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