Leighton project director can't recall 2015 report to MTRC

Local | 8 Nov 2018 2:30 pm

A senior executive of the main contractor in the Hung Hom MTR Station construction scandal has told an inquiry that he was informed about cutting of bars at the site only this year, although a report on defective bars was issued in his name three years ago, RTHK reports.

This came as a lawyer for the Commission of Inquiry brought up the 2015 report to Leighton project director Malcolm Plummer who was testifying via a video link from Australia.

Plummer is the first senior official from the company to respond to reports that steel bars were cut short at the station instead of being screwed into couplers at a platform structure, raising doubts about its safety.

The non-conformance report on defective steel bars was issued to the MTRC and Fang Sheung Construction, which carried out bar bending works.

"I can’t honestly remember,” Plummer said. "I can’t recall seeing it.''

Plummer then said he was only made aware of the bar cutting earlier this year. The panel's lawyer then questioned whether Plummer was surprised he was not given any information about it, as he is the project director.

"Not really", said Plummer. But he agreed that it was serious enough to warrant further investigation.

The Leighton executive also told the panel that allegations of corruption surrounding the project are "completely false" and a "fabrication.''

This came as Leighton's lawyer asked about an allegation made by Jason Poon of subcontractor China Technology, that Plummer told him he was concerned about corruption in the project.

Plummer said Poon's claim "is completely false.''

The chairman of the Commission of Inquiry, Justice Michael Hartman, asked whether the witness could recall having any one-on-one discussions with Poon on any subject.

Plummer replied: "Various statements by Mr Poon about corruption and any confession about all this sort of thing are a complete fabrication. Nothing like this ever occurred.”

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